Scenes From The “Home-Place”

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We’re about done with first cutting on the home-place then we’ll be on to the other hay fields located elsewhere.  It hasn’t gotten real crazy – not yet.  For now all activities are right here where no one has to drive anywhere or haul anything anywhere or… drive anywhere.  Ahhh.  I’m taking it all in. 

 

 

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Don’t get me wrong, I don’t really mind the running.  It’s just that I’m kind of a home-body and would rather just stay put.  I do love that everyone gets all amped up and the adrenaline runs high.  Plus the team work and choreographing of it all kicks in, especially when we’re trying to beat a storm and that makes it fun. 

 

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Speaking of fun…Jake had fun the other day. 

There was one field that was mostly grass hay and it needed to be round-baled.

 

 

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The boy got to run “Billy The Round Baler” for the first time ever all by himself. 

He was feeling pretty smart about it too.

 

 

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Billy was good.  He had all winter to think about his bad self down at the tractor hospital so we’re glad he’s back and doing the good job we know he can do.

 

 

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Kinda fun standing around taking pictures.  I love being on the home-place…they really don’t need that extra set of hands yet that they’ll need later. 

However, that later is bearing down real fast.

 

 

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For now I’m pretty much standing around watching everyone else work.

 

 

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Boy they do good work.  Or I could also say, “This boy in particular does good work”.

 

 

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Extreme thinks so too. 

See how impressed he was watching Jake back up to the shop?

 

 

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So impressed he went back to eating.

That bird up in the sky…see it way above Extreme?

 

 

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It’s a Bald Eagle. 

Since we moved here five years ago there’s been a male and female that live in the woods on the other side of the shop.  I don’t think I saw them even once last year.  I’m so happy they’re back.   Love, love seeing and hearing them. 

 

 

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These are the flowers that are residing in the whiskey barrels I picked up down in Indiana this spring.  We got them planted up last Friday.

 

 

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Donnie, shown here, was having himself a big old time and truly “feeling his oats” on this particular morning that I was out walking around. 

 

 

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The dogs were walking with me.  Well, not in this shot.  In this shot Max and I are waiting for Shelby who is seen way, way in the back.  Poor dog, she’s getting stiff and needs some extra time.  Whenever I get to feeling the opposite of Donnie (see above) I just blame Shelby and say I’m waiting on her.  Works for Max too.

 

 

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The pasture water cannons were fired up this past week.  These pastures aren’t hay ground, they’re strictly grazing ground for the horses.  Keeping them watered keeps them green.  Keeping them watered keeps plenty of grass growing for the horses to eat.  By the way, the horses aren’t allowed to eat 24/7 – they wouldn’t fit through the barn doors if they were.  Also, keeping them watered not only ensures the horses have plenty to eat but that we have plenty to mow… But you didn’t hear that from the girl who has mow-a-phobia

*Note:  I also know job security when I see it – so no smart-aleck remarks.

 

 

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This is the Northwest hay field on the farm here.  This is the same field I buried the snowmobile in all the way up to it’s handlebars last winter.  In fact, in the low spot near the fence to the upper left is where it happened.  For that post packed with an impressive display of common sense click here. 

This was the last field of four drying on the home-place when I took this picture.  Since then it’s been rained on at least three times, pounded on most all last night and will be great cow hay and a perfect job for Billy The Round Baler.  I hope he’s up for it because I don’t relish the thought of having to burn this field like we had to resort to last year because Billy wasn’t in the mood to work.  If you missed the scintillating post on that fire torching shindig it can be found by clicking here.

I can be found only when I want to be and I think I’ll go get lost now.

The End.

“Home-place” – Noun.  A made up word.  Not found in any dictionary I own.  First heard by me in Shipshewana, Indiana.  Best I can tell a Midwest term for the main farm when many other parcels are involved in the workings of said farm, facilitating the need to drive farm/haying equipment to and fro all hours of the day and night making your life interesting a mind bending personal challenge and your neighbors who live on your dusty gravel road super impressed with you.

*My smart-mouth disclaimer:  See above remark about job security!

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10 thoughts on “Scenes From The “Home-Place”

  1. nice job on billy there jake. doesn’t ford make a baler that you just hook up to your pickup.
    maybe a chevy could do it if ford can’t . by the way is everything still together on your ford. just wondering with you driving it. got you jake. pictures make farming life look so good but at times we know it isn’t. with jake there, i know you can handle it.
    brock has a new name. half the time when he is playing sports i call him todd, and he is answering automatically. now it’s brocktodd.
    that’s grandpa. he is losing it. take care out there especially around the machinery as you know.
    love you guys & my favorite daughter in law
    gene

    Like

    1. Father-In-Law, you kill me.
      Honestly, the other day when he was driving around in a tractor I thought to myself, “What am I gonna do without him someday?!”
      Right now Jake is out on the East Coast getting re-acquainted with a Soto boy or two…They used to call him JakeRod when he was tiny. Wonder if they still will?
      I’ll make sure he reads this and that crack about a Chevy!
      love,
      your favorite daughter-in-law, d.

      Like

  2. Such interesting pictures. Love the ones of the eagles and Donnie “kicking up his heels”!
    I once dated a farmer, and I remember the logistics of moving equipment. It’s more complicated than one would think, and he was a small-time farmer!

    Like

  3. Thanks ! The summer I turned 16 I drove a combine for a “custom cutter” out west.. we went from Enid, Oklahoma to just south of the Canadian border primarily cuttting wheat. You can imagine my surprise when I found out the combines had lights!

    Like

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